The PSNI has defended its decision to allow a band wearing Parachute Regiment badges to take part in Saturday's Apprentice Boys parade in Derry.

Commenting on the policing operation, Assistant Chief Constable Alan Todd said: “Anyone in Northern Ireland, including those of us who have responsibility for policing it, understand that in our society space, history and symbols often remain contested. This can result in many difficult policing decisions. That was the situation we found ourselves in on Saturday in Derry/Londonderry.

“The vast majority of the people who arrived in Derry/Londonderry at the weekend to participate in the parade did so within the law and with due regard to that context.

“One band, chose to take an approach which we believed would have interfered with our legitimate purpose of keeping the peace and keeping people safe. On that basis we engaged with them and sought their cooperation to address that in a constructive way; they chose not to do so. We sought to engage the involvement of the Organisers and their Marshals to assist us in that and they were unable to do so.

“With a large number of people delayed for a significant amount of time, where some people were parading on the Cityside and other people were waiting on the Waterside area of the City, instead of persisting in that delay with the risks that entailed, we chose to make other operational arrangements to help ensure that people were kept safe and prevent a breach of the peace or a likely breach of the peace for the remainder of the parade.

“Once the parade was finished we took steps to seek to identify those within the band so that we could fulfil our duty to put the matters and facts before the Public Prosecution Service in order that they might determine if there was any liability on the part of those people responsible. That is a legitimate policing purpose and was done so professionally. Once those details and assurances were given to us those people were free to travel on their way.

“As a policing service we have a professional responsibility, and a legitimate purpose, to maintain the peace and keep people safe. These were the objectives of our decision making on Saturday. The event passed off peacefully, people were kept safe, no one was hurt and nobody was unduly inconvenienced by police actions.

“Derry/Londonderry has for a long time been considered the model for parades and protest. Efforts must now turn to dialogue to ensure that the that the good work of years gone by can be continued.”

If you have a story or want to send a photo or video to us please contact the Derry Now editorial team on 028 7129 6600 for Derry City stories Or 028 7774 3970 for County Derry stories. Or you can email [email protected] or [email protected] at any time.